Futuro house

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The WeeGee Exhibition Centre has acquired the first ever mass-produced Futuro house (no. 001), which was owned by Matti Kuusla from summer 1968 to autumn 2011 and located in Hirvensalmi. The Futuro, exposed to the elements for over 40 years, has been carefully restored and then brought to WeeGee’s courtyard.

The house is open to the public during summertime, from May to August.

Space-Age Utopia

The Futuro is a plastic house designed by architect Matti Suuronen. Elliptical in shape, the house captures the experimental forms, new materials and optimistic ideas of the space-age architecture and design of the late 1960s..

From Skiing Lodge to International Fame

The Futuro house was originally commissioned as a skiing lodge that would be quick to heat and easy to construct even in rough terrain. First launched in 1968, the house made headlines in Finland and abroad. It was, however, too peculiar and too expensive to break into the mass market. With the 1973 Oil Crisis tripling the price of plastic, all hopes of the Futuro ever conquering the world had to be abandoned.

Futuro House

The New Life of the Futuro

Although the Futuro house was nearly forgotten, from the 1990s on it has been given a new life, not only as a 1960s space-age icon but also as a work of art gaining exposure in the international art world.

Today, about 65 known Futuro houses remain in various corners of the world. Only two of these are in public collections: the Futuro prototype (no. 000) at the Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen in Rotterdam and now Futuro (no. 001) at the WeeGee Exhibition Centre in Espoo.

   

  

Published 6/8/2012 3:08 PM , updated 3/12/2014 9:47 AM